How will you feel?

It’s common for carers to experience a range of feelings about their new role and responsibilities, and many describe it as an emotional roller-coaster. Often these feelings are similar to those experienced by the person with cancer – some studies show that carers can have even higher levels of distress.

Many carers find it reassuring to know that their feelings are a normal reaction to the demands of the role. Here we describe some of the common emotions experienced by carers. It’s important to give yourself permission to take care of your own emotional wellbeing. Start by thinking about how you have coped with difficult times in the past, and see Ways to Manage Your Emotions for some strategies that may help you manage your feelings.

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Listen to podcasts on Cancer Affects the Carer Too and How to Help Someone with Cancer


A sense of satisfaction

While caring can be challenging at times, many carers say that it can also be a rewarding experience. Providing support for someone can bring a sense of satisfaction, achievement and personal growth.

Knowing that you are supporting someone during a time of need can help you feel good about yourself. Being there for them and helping even in small ways can strengthen your relationship and create lasting memories.

You may not always feel this sense of satisfaction when you’re caring for someone on a day-to-day basis. However, some people find that when their caring role ends, they are able to reflect on the positive and gratifying parts of their caring experience.


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Cancer Council NSW carers support services
We can offer support online, over the phone and in person. We can also link you to our practical support services and provide information on a wide range of cancer-related topics.

Cancer information

What is cancer?
How cancer starts and spreads

Emotions and cancer
Here are some suggestions for managing the physical effects of the diagnosis, coping with the diagnosis, as well as how to get support.

View our publications
Guides and fact sheets for people with cancer, their families and friends

 

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