Palliative care

Palliative care, also called supportive care, is person-centred care that helps people live as comfortably as possible. It can be used at any stage of advanced cancer – not just at end of life.

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Palliative care

  • Who can refer me to palliative care?
  • Who will be a part of my palliative care team?
  • Who will coordinate my care?
  • Where will I receive palliative care?
  • If I’m at home, what kind of help will be available?
  • Can I contact the palliative care team at any time? Who do I call after hours?
  • Will the palliative care team talk to my GP and cancer specialists about my care?
  • How long will I need palliative care for? What is my prognosis?
  • How can I get a second opinion about my need for palliative care?
  • Do I need to see a specialist palliative care service?
  • What if my condition unexpectedly improves?

Other treatment

  • Are there other treatments available that might cure the cancer?
  • If the cancer cannot be cured, what is the aim of the treatments?
  • Will I receive active treatment for the cancer if I have palliative care?
  • Are there any clinical trials I could join?
  • If I don’t have further treatment, what should I expect?
  • Are there any complementary therapies that might help?

Support services

  • Can my family or carers get respite care or other assistance?
  • Do I have to pay for any palliative care services?
  • What financial and practical assistance is available?
  • Can you help me talk to my family about what is happening?

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We are conducting a research study about the support needed by people affected by cancer, including anyone with a current or past cancer diagnosis, and anyone caring for someone affected by cancer.

This information will be used to plan CCNSW services and to campaign for broader health system changes to improve the quality of life of people affected by cancer.