Infertility

Surgery or radiation therapy for ovarian cancer will mean you are unable to conceive children. Before treatment starts, ask your doctor or fertility specialist about what options are available to you. Women under 40 who have stage I ovarian cancer may be able to have surgery that leaves the uterus and one ovary in place. They will, however, need to avoid pregnancy while on chemotherapy.

Many women experience a sense of loss when told that their reproductive organs will be removed or will no longer function. You may feel extremely upset if you cannot have children, and may worry about the impact of this on your relationship or future relationships. Even if your family is complete or you were not planning to have children, you may feel a sense of loss and grief.

If you have a partner, you may find it helpful to talk to them about your feelings. Speaking to a counsellor or gynaecological oncology nurse may also help. For more information call Cancer Council 13 11 20 or see Fertility and cancer.


This information was last reviewed in April 2018
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