Fatigue

It is common to feel very tired during or after treatment for lung cancer and you may lack the energy to carry out day-to-day activities. Fatigue for people with cancer is different from tiredness, as it doesn’t always go away with rest or sleep.

If fatigue continues for long periods of time, you may lose interest in things that you usually enjoy doing or feel unable to concentrate on one thing for very long.

Let your treatment team know if you are struggling with fatigue. Sometimes fatigue can be caused by a low red blood cell count or the side effects of drugs, and can be treated.

Listen to a podcast on Managing Cancer Fatigue


This information was last reviewed in November 2016.
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