Taking part in a clinical trial

Your doctor or nurse may suggest you take part in a clinical trial. Doctors run clinical trials to test new or modified treatments and ways of diagnosing disease to see if they are better than current methods. For example, if you join a randomised trial for a new treatment, you will be chosen at random to receive either the best existing treatment or the modified new treatment.

Over the years, trials have improved treatments and led to better outcomes for people diagnosed with cancer. For some people with advanced cancer, participation in a clinical trial may be a way to access new therapies.

It may be helpful to talk to your specialist or a clinical trials nurse, or to get a second opinion about participating in a clinical trial. If you decide to take part, you can withdraw at any time.

For more information, call Cancer Council 13 11 20 for a free copy of Understanding Clinical Trials and Research, or visit the government’s Australian Cancer Trials.


This information was last reviewed in December 2016
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