Detecting skin cancer

It’s important to get to know your own skin and Cancer Council recommends you check your skin every three months. Most people have moles, birth marks, freckles and blemishes. Get to know these well, and it is  more likely you will notice if anything has changed since you last looked.

Skin cancers (including melanoma) that are detected and treated early have a better outcome than most other types of cancer. Also, skin cancer that is found early needs less invasive treatment.

What to look for
Look for these things when checking your skin:

  • any spot, mole or freckle that has changed in shape, size or colour
  • a new spot that is different from other spots around it
  • any small, dome-shaped lump that wasn’t there before
  • a sore that doesn’t heal and/or ulcerates or one that heals and breaks down again
  • any skin spot that you are worried about.

How and when to check your skin
As a general rule, the more regularly you check your skin, the greater the chance of detecting a skin cancer before it becomes life threatening.

It’s easy to check your skin and should only take 15 minutes. Just follow these steps and or ask your friend or relative to look at the parts you can’t see.

Remember to:

  • check your whole body – from head to toe, front, back and sides
  • check your head and neck – don’t forget your scalp, ears, face and lips. Check the torso, front back and sides
  • check your arms and hands, including the nail beds
  • check your buttocks and legs – don’t forget the soles of your feet, and between the toes and the nail beds.

When to see a doctor
The risk of developing skin cancer increases with age,  however melanoma  is also a common cancer in younger people. Get to know your own skin and consult your  GP immediately at the first sign of any change.

People at high risk of skin cancer should be advised by their  GP about checking their own  skin, as well as having regular check ups with their GP and/or dermatologist.

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Instructions for downloading and reading EPUB files

Apple devices

The iBooks application must be installed on your Apple device before you can read the EPUB.
Different ways to download an EPUB file to your Apple device:

  • email EPUB files to yourself and transfer the attachment to iBooks.
  • copy EPUB files into DropBox (or a similar service) and use the DropBox app to send them to iBooks.
  • open EPUB files directly from Mobile Safari and open them in iBooks, where they are saved automatically by downloading the EPUB from the website.

Need more help? Visit: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4059

Kobo

To download an EPUB file to your Kobo from a Windows computer:

  • download and save the EPUB directly onto your desktop.
  • connect your Kobo to your computer using the USB cable and tap “Connect” on your eReader.
  • select “Open folder to view files” to view the contents of your Kobo.
  • navigate to where you have stored your EPUB file in “Finder”, in documents or downloads, and drag and drop it into the Kobo window. You can now disconnect your Kobo to read the eBook.

To download an EPUB to your Kobo from a Mac:

  • download and save the EPUB directly onto your desktop.
  • connect your Kobo to your computer using the USB cable and tap “Connect” on your eReader.
  • open your “Finder” application.
  • select “Kobo eReader” from the listed devices to view the contents of your Kobo.
  • navigate to where you have stored your EPUB file in “Finder”, probably in documents or downloads, and drag and drop it into the Kobo window. You can now disconnect your Kobo to read the eBook.

Turn on your Kobo and your EPUB will be located in “eBooks”, while a PDF will be located in “Documents”.
Need more information? Visit: http://www.kobo.com/help/koboaura/response/?id=3784&type=3

Sony Reader

To download an EPUB file on your Sony Reader™:

  • ensure you have already installed the Reader™ Library for PC/Mac software
  • select the eBook you want from our website and click the link to download it.
  • connect the Reader™ to your computer.
  • open the Reader™ Library software and click “Library” in the left-hand pane and select the eBook to view it.

Need more help? Visit: https://au.readerstore.sony.com/apps_and_devices/

Amazon Kindle 2nd Generation devices

EPUB files can’t be read on the Amazon Kindle™. However, like most eReaders, Kindle™ 2nd Generation devices are able to display PDFs. We recommend that you download the PDF version of this booklet if you would like to read it on a Kindle™.
To transfer a PDF to your Kindle™ via USB cable from your computer or Mac:

  • download the PDF directly onto your computer.
  • connect the USB cable to your computer’s USB port, and the micro USB end of the cable to your Kindle™. Note: the Kindle™ won’t be available as a reading device while it is connected to your computer until it has been disconnected.
  • open the Kindle™ drive and several folders will appear inside. The “Documents” folder is where you will need to copy or drag the PDF to.
  • safely eject your Kindle™ from your computer and unplug the USB cable. Your content will appear on the Home Screen.

Kindle also provides a Kindle Personal Documents Service that allows users to send documents as an attachment directly to your eReader. For more information on this service, visit http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=help_search_1-1?ie=UTF8&nodeId=200767340&qid=1395967989&sr=1-1
For more information on accessing a PDF on your Kindle™, visit www.amazon.com/manageyourkindle, log in to your account and click on Personal Document Settings.
Need more help? Visit https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200375630

Android and PC

You can also download and open eBooks on Android devices and PCs with appropriate apps or software installed. Suitable eReader apps for Android include Google Play Books, FBReader and Moon+ Reader. Suitable software for PCs include Calibre and Adobe Digital Editions.