Lifestyle and Cancer – What do we know? A Guide for Health Professionals

In Australia, one in two men and one in three women will be diagnosed with cancer before the age of 85. The number of new cancer cases diagnosed each year is rising. Recently, cancer has overtaken heart disease as the greatest burden (in terms of death and disability) of disease and injury in Australia. About 39,000 people die from cancer in Australia each year. The most commonly diagnosed cancers are prostate, colorectal, breast, melanoma and lung cancer.

Evidence is strengthening that body weight, physical activity and dietary factors influence the risk of some cancers. In 2003, the World Health Organisation Report on Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases confirmed that poor diet and lack of physical activity are second only to tobacco as theoretically preventable causes of cancer. Appropriate diet, body weight and physical activity could prevent approximately one third of the most common cancers in industrialised countries.

In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund found that the evidence that body weight and physical inactivity increased cancer risk was particularly strong.

Alcohol is a risk factor for cancer of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, breast, colorectum and liver.

Key Messages

  • Cancer is a major cause of illness and death in Australia
  • Lifestyle factors, such as overweight, poor diet and lack of physical activity are second only to tobacco as theoretically preventable causes of cancer
  • There is convincing evidence that being overweight or obese increases the risk of developing some of the most common cancers
  • There is convincing evidence that undertaking regular physical activity reduces the risk of developing some of the most common cancers
  • There is convincing evidence that alcohol consumption increases the risk of developing some cancers, including breast cancer
  • It is likely that eating more vegetables and fruit will reduce the risk of developing some cancers
  • The lifestyle recommendations for reducing cancer risk are consistent with guidelines for heart disease and diabetes prevention, as well as for general good health

Maintaining a healthy weight, regular physical activity and good nutrition can help prevent cancer.

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Lifestyle and Cancer What do we Know? A Guide for Health Professionals

Instructions for downloading and reading EPUB files

Apple devices

The iBooks application must be installed on your Apple device before you can read the EPUB.
Different ways to download an EPUB file to your Apple device:

  • email EPUB files to yourself and transfer the attachment to iBooks.
  • copy EPUB files into DropBox (or a similar service) and use the DropBox app to send them to iBooks.
  • open EPUB files directly from Mobile Safari and open them in iBooks, where they are saved automatically by downloading the EPUB from the website.

Need more help? Visit: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4059

Kobo

To download an EPUB file to your Kobo from a Windows computer:

  • download and save the EPUB directly onto your desktop.
  • connect your Kobo to your computer using the USB cable and tap “Connect” on your eReader.
  • select “Open folder to view files” to view the contents of your Kobo.
  • navigate to where you have stored your EPUB file in “Finder”, in documents or downloads, and drag and drop it into the Kobo window. You can now disconnect your Kobo to read the eBook.

To download an EPUB to your Kobo from a Mac:

  • download and save the EPUB directly onto your desktop.
  • connect your Kobo to your computer using the USB cable and tap “Connect” on your eReader.
  • open your “Finder” application.
  • select “Kobo eReader” from the listed devices to view the contents of your Kobo.
  • navigate to where you have stored your EPUB file in “Finder”, probably in documents or downloads, and drag and drop it into the Kobo window. You can now disconnect your Kobo to read the eBook.

Turn on your Kobo and your EPUB will be located in “eBooks”, while a PDF will be located in “Documents”.
Need more information? Visit: http://www.kobo.com/help/koboaura/response/?id=3784&type=3

Sony Reader

To download an EPUB file on your Sony Reader™:

  • ensure you have already installed the Reader™ Library for PC/Mac software
  • select the eBook you want from our website and click the link to download it.
  • connect the Reader™ to your computer.
  • open the Reader™ Library software and click “Library” in the left-hand pane and select the eBook to view it.

Need more help? Visit: https://au.readerstore.sony.com/apps_and_devices/

Amazon Kindle 2nd Generation devices

EPUB files can’t be read on the Amazon Kindle™. However, like most eReaders, Kindle™ 2nd Generation devices are able to display PDFs. We recommend that you download the PDF version of this booklet if you would like to read it on a Kindle™.
To transfer a PDF to your Kindle™ via USB cable from your computer or Mac:

  • download the PDF directly onto your computer.
  • connect the USB cable to your computer’s USB port, and the micro USB end of the cable to your Kindle™. Note: the Kindle™ won’t be available as a reading device while it is connected to your computer until it has been disconnected.
  • open the Kindle™ drive and several folders will appear inside. The “Documents” folder is where you will need to copy or drag the PDF to.
  • safely eject your Kindle™ from your computer and unplug the USB cable. Your content will appear on the Home Screen.

Kindle also provides a Kindle Personal Documents Service that allows users to send documents as an attachment directly to your eReader. For more information on this service, visit http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=help_search_1-1?ie=UTF8&nodeId=200767340&qid=1395967989&sr=1-1
For more information on accessing a PDF on your Kindle™, visit www.amazon.com/manageyourkindle, log in to your account and click on Personal Document Settings.
Need more help? Visit https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200375630