Massage from family and friends

Massage from family and friends

Family and friends are often eager to do something useful for you. One way you may like them to help is by giving you a simple, gentle massage.    Massage sessions need not be long – a few minutes here and there or a planned half-hour can benefit you enormously.

To avoid causing you discomfort, the person massaging should:

  • remove jewellery
  • cut their nails
  • make the same adjustments that a professional therapist would, e.g.  reducing pressure or speed of stroke.

If you feel pain or discomfort, ask for gentler pressure or for a massage in a different area of the body.

Foot massage

Apply lotion to the feet with slow strokes using full-hand contact. Rest one foot between the hands and apply moderate pressure with the thumbs along the sole of the foot.

Head and ear massage

Sit down for this massage.  Using moderate pressure, gently rotate fingertips all around the crown. Move to the top of the ears, gently tweaking them between the thumb and forefinger, down to the lobes. Work the fingers behind the ears and across the back of the skull.

Back massage

Apply lotion to the back using long, slow strokes with full-hand contact. Gently squeeze muscles with moderate and controlled pressure along the length of the back. You may prefer to lie on your side rather than face down for this massage.

Self-help

Acupressure is similar to acupuncture – without the needles – and it is easy to do yourself. Pressure points on the body represent different organs. Massaging these points gently may help relieve a variety of symptoms.

Focus on each point for a few minutes on both sides of the body. Pressure need not be strong; even soft touch is beneficial.

Pressure point: pericardium 6

This point  is in between the ligaments (fibrous tissue) of the wrist.  Measure three finger widths from the base of the palm along the wrist (about where a watch sits). Hold the point in the middle of the wrist with moderate pressure for several minutes or apply small circular strokes with firm pressure. Pressure on this point helps reduce nausea, pain, anxiety, insomnia and breathing difficulties.

Xiphoid process

This point is at the space where the ribs meet at the breastbone. Gently circling the fingers on the xiphoid process is calming for many people.

Abdominal massage

This stimulates intestinal motion and soothes the entire body. Apply lotion to the whole abdomen (tummy) in a “right-to-left” direction. Also circle the fingers around the bellybutton.

Pressure point: kidney 1

This point is in the middle of the sole of the foot. The best way to massage it is by rolling the arch of the foot over a tennis ball on the floor. Pressure on this point may improve energy, anxiety, and flu-like symptoms.

Pressure point: large intestine 4

This point is found in the muscle located between the thumb and forefinger. Pressure and massage on this point can stimulate intestinal activity, possibly easing constipation.

View our editoral policy

Instructions for downloading and reading EPUB files

Apple devices

The iBooks application must be installed on your Apple device before you can read the EPUB.
Different ways to download an EPUB file to your Apple device:

  • email EPUB files to yourself and transfer the attachment to iBooks.
  • copy EPUB files into DropBox (or a similar service) and use the DropBox app to send them to iBooks.
  • open EPUB files directly from Mobile Safari and open them in iBooks, where they are saved automatically by downloading the EPUB from the website.

Need more help? Visit: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4059

Kobo

To download an EPUB file to your Kobo from a Windows computer:

  • download and save the EPUB directly onto your desktop.
  • connect your Kobo to your computer using the USB cable and tap “Connect” on your eReader.
  • select “Open folder to view files” to view the contents of your Kobo.
  • navigate to where you have stored your EPUB file in “Finder”, in documents or downloads, and drag and drop it into the Kobo window. You can now disconnect your Kobo to read the eBook.

To download an EPUB to your Kobo from a Mac:

  • download and save the EPUB directly onto your desktop.
  • connect your Kobo to your computer using the USB cable and tap “Connect” on your eReader.
  • open your “Finder” application.
  • select “Kobo eReader” from the listed devices to view the contents of your Kobo.
  • navigate to where you have stored your EPUB file in “Finder”, probably in documents or downloads, and drag and drop it into the Kobo window. You can now disconnect your Kobo to read the eBook.

Turn on your Kobo and your EPUB will be located in “eBooks”, while a PDF will be located in “Documents”.
Need more information? Visit: http://www.kobo.com/help/koboaura/response/?id=3784&type=3

Sony Reader

To download an EPUB file on your Sony Reader™:

  • ensure you have already installed the Reader™ Library for PC/Mac software
  • select the eBook you want from our website and click the link to download it.
  • connect the Reader™ to your computer.
  • open the Reader™ Library software and click “Library” in the left-hand pane and select the eBook to view it.

Need more help? Visit: https://au.readerstore.sony.com/apps_and_devices/

Amazon Kindle 2nd Generation devices

EPUB files can’t be read on the Amazon Kindle™. However, like most eReaders, Kindle™ 2nd Generation devices are able to display PDFs. We recommend that you download the PDF version of this booklet if you would like to read it on a Kindle™.
To transfer a PDF to your Kindle™ via USB cable from your computer or Mac:

  • download the PDF directly onto your computer.
  • connect the USB cable to your computer’s USB port, and the micro USB end of the cable to your Kindle™. Note: the Kindle™ won’t be available as a reading device while it is connected to your computer until it has been disconnected.
  • open the Kindle™ drive and several folders will appear inside. The “Documents” folder is where you will need to copy or drag the PDF to.
  • safely eject your Kindle™ from your computer and unplug the USB cable. Your content will appear on the Home Screen.

Kindle also provides a Kindle Personal Documents Service that allows users to send documents as an attachment directly to your eReader. For more information on this service, visit http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=help_search_1-1?ie=UTF8&nodeId=200767340&qid=1395967989&sr=1-1
For more information on accessing a PDF on your Kindle™, visit www.amazon.com/manageyourkindle, log in to your account and click on Personal Document Settings.
Need more help? Visit https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200375630